Salary Trends in Animation and Related Fields

Ohio graphic design schools: most expensive to least expensive

Ohio is home to 215 Title IV degree-granting institutions. To become a Title IV school, an institution must meet five requirements. They must have (1) accreditation recognized by the U.S. Department of Education, (2) offer a program of at least 300 clock hours in length, (3) sign a participation agreement with the Department, (4) grant an associate's degree or higher, and (5) be in business for at least two years. Once these requirements have been met, the school becomes eligible for Title IV federal financial-aid programs. 

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Wisconsin Graphic Design Schools

Wisconsin is home 84 Title IV degree-granting colleges and universities. Many of the state’s top Title IVs offer excellent programs for graphic designers. Just a few of Wisconsin’s best schools for artists include Viterbo University of La Crosse, Carroll University of Waukesha, and the University of Wisconsin system.

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Ohio

Ohio is the nation’s seventh largest state. Thanks to a population of more than 11.5 million, Ohio’s sizable collection of colleges is the sixth largest in the U.S. The state’s 215 Title IV degree-granting institutions vary from traditional universities to art and design schools to technical colleges. Although different, Ohio’s Title IV schools have several things in common. They have (1) accreditation recognized by the U.S. Department of Education, (2) offer a program of at least 300 clock hours in length, (3) have signed a participation agreement with the Department, (4) grant an associate's degree or higher, and (5) they have been in business for at least two years. All Title IV schools must meet these requirements in order to be eligible for Title IV financial aid programs. 

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New Orleans Art Scene

Imaginative, experimental, and hip—these are just a few words that describe New Orleans’ unique art scene. The New Orleans Convention & Visitors Bureau says that the New Orleans art scene has become one of the most vital and innovative in the nation. Visitors and locals alike can find out why by engaging in the city's monthly art openings, visiting visual art and performance venues such as the Contemporary Art Center (CAC), or touring the more than 100 galleries in the city. The fun part is, you can get to just about any art gallery in the city by cable car!

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The New York City Art Scene

The State of New York has the second highest population of animators in the U.S. More than 90 percent of these artists live in New York City. Although Los Angeles holds the crown for producing and housing more animators than any other city, New York’s animation scene sees itself as a viable alternative to the L.A., rather than living in its shadow. Instead of relying on large studios to produce the bulk of the art in NYC, the industry taps into its hearty network of local freelancers and prolific indie production studios, with the goal of creating works with varied (and unique) points of view

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Seattle Art Scene

Seattle is the cultural center of the Northwest. Ballet, opera, theater, visual art, and music are as much a part of Seattle as coffee—and everyone loves to indulge. The art scene here is different from other cities mainly because Seattle truly embraces experimental and other alternative forms art. Sure, the city has its fair share of purists, but according to the Seattle Convention and Visitor’s Bureau, for every traditionalist, there’s a non-traditionalist. What this means is—anything goes here, and that’s good news for animators. 

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Washington DC Art Scene

The Washington DC art scene is one of the most progressive in the nation. Although small in comparison to other cities—DC is home to less than 700,000 people, the District is home to around 28,140 salaried professionals working in the art, design, entertainment, sports, and media occupations. Washington DC is also home to some of the country’s most celebrated art museums including the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Gallery of Art, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, and Corcoran Gallery of Art at Corcoran College of Art + Design.

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San Antonio Art Scene

San Antonio has a growing art scene that offers art walks and fairs year-round, dozens of art museums and art galleries of all sizes, and a growing number of art venues and associations that encourage experimental art of all kinds. A good example is the city’s signature arts event called Luminaria. This outdoor public festival is open to all and features film and media artists, visual artists, dancers, musicians, literary artists, and much more.

To get an idea of how fast the art scene has grown in San Antonio, Luminaria has tripled in size over the years, so it moved to a 90-acre park beginning in 2011. This is exciting news for animators interested in displaying their work. The larger space accommodates bigger crowds, larger installations, and more stages for performances. 

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The Houston Art Scene

It’s easy to be an artist in Houston. Why? For starters, Houston is the largest and one of the most creative cities in Texas, yet the Houston art scene isn’t oversaturated. Next, Houston is considered the country’s number one job creator, it is home to 26 Fortune 500 companies and a dollar stretches farther here than anywhere else  in the U.S. Finally, Houston’s local galleries are not so conservative as some people think. In fact, the city’s numerous galleries and institutes are open to displaying experimental art of all kinds—this includes animation. 

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The Albuquerque Art Scene

New Mexico is home to more than 8,000 salaried artists and thousands of independent artists.  This means, no matter where you go in the state, you will likely find a lively art scene with local artists selling everything from paintings to pottery. Some cities have a larger scene than others, though. Albuquerque, Las Cruces, and nearby Santa Fe are just a few. Albuquerque (the biggest city in the state), happens to have the largest and liveliest scene. 

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